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Treasury Notes

 Five Questions with Treasury’s 2012 President’s SAVE Award Finalist

By: Anthony Reyes
12/20/2012

Earlier this week, the White House announced the finalists for the President’s 2012 Securing Americans Value and Efficiency (SAVE) Award and one of them is a Treasury employee who works as an accountant for the Internal Revenue Service. Finalist Angela Leroux is recommending that agencies eliminate or consolidate the bus service that shuttles employees from one government office to another by encouraging the use of conference and video calls, or providing metro cards to those with a need to travel for a meeting.

Since its creation in 2009, President Obama’s SAVE Award has served as a vehicle for Federal employees to offer firsthand their ideas on how to improve performance and ensure taxpayer dollars are spent wisely. Over the last four years, Federal workers have submitted tens of thousands of ideas to curb unnecessary spending – covering everything from new measures to conserve energy use to cutting back on paper copies of publications already available online, like the Federal Register.  As Office of Management and Budget Deputy Director Jeff Zients said, these ideas alone won’t solve the Nation’s long-term fiscal challenges, but they are saving hundreds of millions of dollars and represent common-sense steps to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of government and provide a better value to the American people.

Keeping with tradition, this year’s winner will present his or her idea to the President in the Oval Office, and other proposals will be directed to agencies for potential action or inclusion in the President’s Budget. Leroux took a moment to answer some questions about her SAVE award idea, and we strongly encourage everyone to vote for her before public voting closes Friday at noon ET. Voting can be done through the White House website at www.whitehouse.gov/save-award.

Five Questions for Angela Leroux, accountant at the IRS and finalist for the President’s SAVE Award

1.     What is your idea for the President’s SAVE Award?

Some agencies maintain shuttle buses that transport employees between buildings. For example, [in Washington, D.C.,] there are agency buses that transport people between the Northeast section of the city to the Main building in the Northwest section. There are rarely more than a few people on the buses and many times they are even empty. I recommended that they have the agencies that maintain these shuttles consolidate their routes and reduce the number of buses or eliminate the buses and have the employees use the metro [i.e., subway]. There are metro stations within an easy walk. 

2.     What would you say to the President if you win? 

Thank you!  Thank you for giving me a voice and allowing me the opportunity to make a difference.

3.     Why do you think your idea should win?

It’s simple, requires no capital investment, and can be implemented now for immediate savings.

4.     How long have you worked at the IRS?

I have worked for the IRS for three years.  I have worked for the federal government for eight years. 

5. Are there things you do individually at work to help save? 

I often save documents as electronic files instead of maintaining hard copies, which helps to eliminate paper.


Anthony Reyes is the New Media Specialist at the U.S. Department of the Treasury.

Posted in:  Management and Budget
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