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 Secretary Lew Announces Historic Decision To Feature A Woman On The Newly Redesigned Ten Dollar Note


Treasury seeks public input on currency theme of “Democracy” with #TheNew10​

WASHINGTON - Treasury Secretary Jacob J. Lew today announced that a newly redesigned $10 note will feature a woman.  In exercising his responsibility to select currency features and design, Treasury Secretary Lew will select a notable woman – with a focus on celebrating a champion for our inclusive democracy.  In keeping with that theme, the U.S. Department of the Treasury is asking the American people to share ideas, symbols, and designs for the new $10 note that reflect what democracy means to them. You can share your ideas using the hashtag the New 10 or by visiting  
The Treasury Department, with the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, expects to unveil the new $10 note in 2020, the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote.
In 2013, the U.S. Department of the Treasury selected the $10 note for redesign based on a number of factors and with guidance from the Advanced Counterfeit Deterrence (ACD) Steering Committee, an inter-agency group established to monitor and communicate counterfeit deterrence issues and dedicated to maintaining and ensuring the integrity of U.S. currency. While many factors are taken into consideration, the primary reason for redesigning currency is to address current and potential counterfeiting threats.  In addition to featuring a woman, the new $10 note will include a tactile feature that increases accessibility for the visually impaired.

“America’s currency is a way for our nation to make a statement about who we are and what we stand for.  Our paper bills—and the images of great American leaders and symbols they depict—have long been a way for us to honor our past and express our values,” said Secretary Jacob J. Lew.   “We have only made changes to the faces on our currency a few times since bills were first put into circulation, and I’m proud that the new 10 will be the first bill in more than a century to feature the portrait of a woman.”

Historically, the Secretary has relied on the Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) to provide advice on themes, symbols and concepts to be used on currency.  However, for the newly redesigned $10 note, the Secretary is seeking input from the public about what qualities best represent democracy to help guide the design process for the next generation of notes.
Over the summer, Secretary Lew, Deputy Secretary Sarah Bloom Raskin, Treasurer Rosie Rios, and other Administration officials will be conducting roundtables, town halls, and other meetings to collect input.  Throughout the process, Treasury will also be reviewing comments submitted via, as well as those posted on social media using “TheNew10” hashtag, or #TheNew10.  Treasury staff will review the input received and provide information to Secretary Lew over the course of the discussion.
While the final decision on all design features belongs to Secretary Lew, he will receive regular updates on the public feedback as he considers new design aspects and the portrait selection for the $10 note.  He will announce his selection later this year.
Visit​  to learn more and use #TheNew10 to share your ideas. 


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